Toneburst Maps and Fragments by David Tudor and Sophia Ogielska | October 22 | Issue Project Room (New York)

toneburst-wesleyan-1996-map-4-s-ogielska

You Nakai is part of this David Tudor event hosted by Harvestworks at the Issue Project Room in downtown Brooklyn. Michael Johnsen is performing his version of Untitled (with some cloned instruments using the schematics he and You found/drew out), John D.S. Adams and John Driscoll will be presenting their views, and Tudor and Sophia Ogielska’s Toneburst Maps and Fragments will be on display.

http://www.harvestworks.org/oct-22-toneburst-maps-and-fragments-by-david-tudor-1926-1996-and-sophia-ogielski/

“In 1995-96 David Tudor collaborated with Sophia Ogielska on a visual language for representing David’s music compositions created in analog circuits. Focusing on Tudor’s composition Toneburst for Merce Cunningham’s Sounddance, they developed Toneburst Maps and Fragments — a collaborative installation work which used visual elements derived from David Tudor’s scores. The work was first exhibited at the Ezra and Cecile Zilka Gallery at Wesleyan University in 1996.

ISSUE Project Room partners with Harvestworks to present an exhibition of their selected visual works – Toneburst Maps and Fragments — and a contemporary interpretation of the works accompanied by a panel discussion. This event is presented as part of the 50th anniversary of Experiments in Art and Technology.

Described as the essence of the music of David Tudor, the event marks a unique opportunity to see and hear Toneburst. The early evening panel is moderated by John Driscoll, with context and background presented by John D.S. Adams and You Nakai. Further, Sophia and Andy Ogielska discuss details about their collaboration with Tudor.

Following the panel, a performance by Michael Johnsen highlights his current research in the circuit-level documentation of David Tudor’s “folkloric” homemade instruments at Wesleyan University. Serving as the only remaining clues to these pieces, Tudor’s exquisite score diagrams are simultaneously explicit and opaque to the would-be performer. Using electronic instruments of his own making, Michael references the “Maps,” which can be entered at any point and traversed in any direction producing multiple performances of the works.”